Fact Checked

July 15, 2008

Illinois State University Blood Soaked Doves

Filed under: ISU Lore — Tags: , , , , — Marcus @ 11:08 am

It is a little known fact the beloved ISU mascot Reggie Redbird was once called Reggie the Blood Soaked Dove.

The Blood Soaked Dove is a symbol of peace by way of war. After the Spanish-American War the Illinois State Fathers officially adopted what had been the unofficial ISU mascot1 ever since the Mexican-American War2.

In the tradition of changing the names of mascots with the zeitgeist, the time honored ISU Mascot Reggie the Blood Soaked Dove was replaced in 19723 due to the public outcry against violence. This trend continues with mascots like Chief Illiniwek4.

In the year 2008 the zeitgeist again took another unforeseen turn, the St. Louis Cardinals are suing Illinois State Athletics, because a ‘redbird’ is nothing more than a cardinal5.

Notes:

Logo Under Consideration

1 “empapado de sangre palomas”
2 The Mexican-American War lasted from 1846-1848, and ISU would not be founded until 1857.
3 In 1961 the mascot was changed to the ‘Shepards’, in 1963 was changed to the ‘fighting Kennedys’, and in 1965 changed back to the Blood Soaked Doves in support of Vietnam.
4 Proposed new mascot: the Fighting Lincolns, in honor of President Lincoln.
5
The St. Louis Cardinals are being sued by the Vatican in two separate lawsuits. The first is the use of the Saint, and the second is for making a mockery of the office of Cardinal. Some speculate this is due to the 2004 World Series.

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